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10 Things You Do that Make People Dislike You Right Away

Hiding Your Emotions1

Do you ever wonder why not everyone likes you as soon as they meet you? (Even though you’re an awesome person and everyone should want to be friends with you.)

Basically, you’ve only got a few seconds to make another person want to spend more time with you as well as want to see you again. In fact, every little thing matters.

We all have a story about how we thought a certain person was weird or mean the first time we met, but realized later that she or he is actually the nicest or coolest friend ever.

We rounded up many scientific findings on specific behaviors that make people dislike you immediately, both online and in real life.

Hiding Your Emotions1© healthsfitness.com

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#1 – Sharing too many Photos on Facebook

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Sharing too many Photos on Facebook1

If you usually share snapshots of your food, shoes, cousin’s graduation, beach vacation, and dog doing random stuff all in the same day, you may want to stop. According to a recent study, posting too many photos on Facebook can damage your real-life relationships.

“This is because people (excluding close friends and relatives) can’t relate well to those who constantly share photos of themselves,” researchers explained. Also, relatives don’t like it when you share too many photos of friends, who, in turn, don’t like it when you’ve got too many family photos.

Although sharing is caring, too much sharing can damage your relationships.

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#2 – Early Revelations of Super Personal
Stuff in a Relationship

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Early Revelations of Super Personal Stuff in a relationship1

Generally, individuals like each other more after sharing confidences. However, being self-disclosed is a great way to make friends as an adult.

Psychologists claim that revealing super personal information, for example, that your brother is cheating on his wife, while you’re still getting to know someone can make you seem weird, insecure, and decrease your chances of likability.

You should never cross the reasonable limits of personal. According to a study from Illinois State University, sticking to simple and pleasant details about your favorite childhood memories and your hobbies can make you seem warmer and more likable.

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#3 – Keep Asking Questions without Talking about Yourself at All

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Keep Asking Questions without Talking about Yourself at All1

Although self-disclosure predicts closeness, it has to be mutual. People will generally like you less if you don’t reciprocate when they reveal something personal.

According to the authors of the study, socially anxious or shy people might keep asking questions of the other to draw away attention from themselves.

The conducted research showed that this is not an effective strategy for relationship initiation. Both parts need to disclose in order to promote mutual closeness and liking.

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#4 – Posting a Close-up Profile Photo

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Posting a Close-up Profile Photo1

If your Facebook profile photo is basically an image of your face smashed up against the camera, it would be wise to change it right now. According to researchers at California Institute of Technology, faces 45 centimeters (almost 1.5 ft) away from the camera are regarded as less attractive, trustworthy, and competent than faces photographed from about 4.5 ft away.

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#5 – Hiding Your Emotions

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Hiding Your Emotions1

Reflecting your real feelings is a better strategy for making other people like you than locking it all up inside, research suggests. In a recent study from the University of Oregon, students watched two movie scenes: a fake-orgasm scene and a sad scene.

Researchers then measured how much interest the participants expressed in befriending the actors in the videos, as well as their assessments of the displayed personalities. Results concluded that actors who suppressed their emotions were judged less likable than those who seemed to react naturally.

So when someone feels that the other person is hiding their real emotions, they may interpret that as a clear disinterest in friendship, which includes interpersonal coordination, social support, and closeness.

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#6 – Acting too Nice

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Acting too Nice1

It may make sense that the nicer you seem, the more people will like you. But some scientific studies showed otherwise.

During a study at Washington State University and the Desert Research Institute, students were asked to play a computer game with four other players, who were actually told they’ll gain certain advantages if they were chosen as remaining playmates by the main players.

As it turns out, the majority of participants claimed they refuse to work with their unselfish teammate again. Some of them said that their unselfish teammate made them look bad, while others suspected they had other hidden motives.

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#7 – Humblebragging

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Humblebragging1

In an attempt to impress other people, some individuals resort to bragging as self-criticism. This behavior is known as ‘humblebragging,’ and could be a big turn-off in a relationship.

In a study from Harvard Business School, researchers asked students give a written answer about their ultimate weakness during a job interview. Results showed that more than ¾ of participants actually humblebragged, notably about being hard-working employees or perfectionists.

On the other side, research assistants said that the participants who were honest
(saying things like ‘sometimes, I overreact to situations’) had higher chances to be hired, as they were remarkably more likable.

Another wonderful trick you can use in a job interview is to talk about a weakness that has nothing to do with the position. (Good luck! & Be honest!)

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#8 – Not Smiling

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Not Smiling1

When you’re at a certain event where you’re meeting lots of new people, it can be difficult to keep a pleasant smile on your face. But you may want to try anyway. It was shown that photos of random people were liked best when they were smiling.

Recently, researchers from the University of Duisburg-Essen and Stanford University revealed that those who interacted with one another using emojis had more positive feelings about the communication when the emoji’s smile was larger.

Moreover, a different study found that smiling at someone when you first meet them will help you make sure they’ll remember you later.

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#9 – Having a Hard-to-pronounce Name

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Having a Hard-to-pronounce Name1

This one isn’t fair. But science is science. Researchers at the University of Leuven, New York University, and the University of Melbourne, found that individuals who have complex last names are often judged negatively.

During an experiment in this study, participants read a newspaper article about a man running for a local council election.

Some of them read about a man with an easy-to-pronounce last name ‘Paradowska or Lazaridis’ while others were given a harder-to-pronounce name ‘Leszczynska and Vougiouklakis’.

Finally, participants who were provided with the simpler name said that he was a better candidate for the government position than those who read about the man with the hard-to-pronounce name.

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#10 – Name-dropping

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Name-dropping1

It is usually tempting to mention that famous artist to impress your conversation partner. But this technique can backfire. Name-dropping makes individuals seem less likable as well as less competent, according to researchers at the University of Zurich. For the study, University of Zurich students interacted with ‘partners’ (who are actually researchers) via email.

In some emails, it was mentioned that Roger Federer was a close friend and that they’d worked out together, in other emails, Federer was mentioned as just a friend. In the third set of emails, the partner wrote that they were a fan of Federer or didn’t mention the famous tennis player at all. Results demonstrated that the stronger is the supposed link between the partner and Federer, the less the partner was liked.

This means that the more you use name-dropping, the more people will dislike you. The researchers concluded that it was mainly because people felt that their partners were being manipulative.

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